Sunday, September 15, 2013

Lessons for the Grown-Ups

As I was looking through the pile of picture books we currently have checked out from the library, I had another realization.  I noticed that a number of them fall into the category of picture books that are really for adults - and into the even smaller subcategory of books that use children and childhood to teach grown-ups a thing or two about how to dream big and "smell the roses."  Cliches one and all and yet, these books are so beautiful, and they way they handle these themes so delicate and witty, they are worth checking out.

How To by Julie Morstad.  This is one of my favorites but my daughters, unsurprisingly, didn't love it - but they liked it more than I though they would.  With whimsical lessons about how to do all sorts of things - be a mermaid, watch where you're going - it has simple lessons about how to enjoy life in the moment, more of use to adults, who have forgotten to live in the moment, rather than children, who still know how to.  Humorous touches, like showing "how to make friends" by drawing your own, and how to watch where you're going by checking out your shadow, amused my girls.  The illustrations have a quiet, spare beauty.  This is one of my favorites.


Line 135 by Germano Zullo.  This book follows a child's travels on a bright green and orange train from the city to the country against a background of simple black-and-white line drawings and reminds us that children, unlike adults, know that anything is possible.
Wait! Wait! by Hatsue Nakawaki.  With illustrations by the talented Komako Sakai, this picture book is perfect for the very youngest readers and reminds the adults who read to them to let children take their time and observe the world around them, as well as to do so themselves.



2 comments:

  1. I'm going to go check these out. :)
    Some Dogs Do I think falls into this category, too. (And I love it.) :)

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  2. I loved the first two books, but haven't read Wait Wait yet. I really want to now!

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